A Guide to Gathering Feedback

A human-centered approach to software means a lot of qualitative research – that’s research that focuses on small-scale, in-person feedback-gathering. While bigger companies have entire departments that do product design and market research, it can be difficult for smaller, distributed teams on a budget to get user feedback. (Difficult, but not impossible: [we interviewed Tails](/blog/formative-testing) about their formative testing practices, for example.)

To that end, Simply Secure created a generic guide to a roughly 1-hour session to gather feedback on your mobile or web app. Individuals and teams can use this to test copy, visuals, and new designs. It’s easy to imagine running a session like this at conferences or meetups where your main audience convenes.

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Questions, comments, pull requests? Write us at contact@simplysecure.org!

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Earning Trust in Sensitive Interviews

Most of the time, honest conversations about sensitive topics happen between people who have known each other a long time, who've worked together, who've built up a foundation of trust. They don't happen when some unknown people cold-email you and ask to make a one-hour appointment with you – right?

Selecting Research Participants for Privacy and Beyond

A screener is a questionnaire that helps researchers recruit the most appropriate participants for their user study research. Here is an example we used for our mobile messaging study in NYC. Blue Ridge Labs handled the recruiting. Most of this screener's questions are a standard part of how they work with potential participants. Our questions, in red, focus on messaging and attitudes towards privacy. Additional questions about VPN use, email, and getting online were for our Fellow Gus Andrews's research.