A Guide to Gathering Feedback

A human-centered approach to software means a lot of qualitative research – that’s research that focuses on small-scale, in-person feedback-gathering. While bigger companies have entire departments that do product design and market research, it can be difficult for smaller, distributed teams on a budget to get user feedback. (Difficult, but not impossible: [we interviewed Tails](/blog/formative-testing) about their formative testing practices, for example.)

To that end, Simply Secure created a generic guide to a roughly 1-hour session to gather feedback on your mobile or web app. Individuals and teams can use this to test copy, visuals, and new designs. It’s easy to imagine running a session like this at conferences or meetups where your main audience convenes.

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Questions, comments, pull requests? Write us at contact@simplysecure.org!

Related

A Guide to Gathering Feedback

While bigger companies have entire departments that do product design and market research, it can be difficult for smaller, distributed teams on a budget to get user feedback. We compiled a session guide to test your app with small groups, ideal for quick feedback at conferences and meetups.

Model Release: Respectfully Sharing Stories

This post is part of a series explaining our publicly available resources for user research. The previous installment covered how to write screeners to recruit participants. This week, we discuss how to get model releases to share photos from user studies. One approach among manyAt Simply Secure, we strive to balance study participants' privacy with building empathy in an audience of developers, policymakers, and designers by sharing study photos and stories.

High-Risk User Research

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