A Guide to Gathering Feedback

A human-centered approach to software means a lot of qualitative research – that’s research that focuses on small-scale, in-person feedback-gathering. While bigger companies have entire departments that do product design and market research, it can be difficult for smaller, distributed teams on a budget to get user feedback. (Difficult, but not impossible: we interviewed Tails about their formative testing practices, for example.)

To that end, Simply Secure created a generic guide to a roughly 1-hour session to gather feedback on your mobile or web app. Individuals and teams can use this to test copy, visuals, and new designs. It’s easy to imagine running a session like this at conferences or meetups where your main audience convenes.

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Questions, comments, pull requests? Write us at contact@simplysecure.org!

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