Fostering Discussions Around Privacy

This week we've been busy in New York City meeting with our advisors and co-hosting Art, Design, and the Future of Privacy. It was gratifying to see so many people turn out to discuss creative ways of approaching an issue that is dear to our hearts, and I know that I'm not the only one who was inspired by the work our speakers are doing. From Lauren McCarthy's crowdsourced relationships, to Sarah Ball's perspective from working as a prison librarian, and straight through to Cory's rousing call for hope and action in the era of peak indifference, the evening showed that the conversation about privacy is for more than just technologists and policy makers.

The event was recorded, and we'll share that recording here and via Twitter as soon as we can. In the meantime, we want to hear about the conversations you're having in your town about privacy. Are you a designer or an artist working on projects that deal with the subject? Are you a software developer who has been inspired to build privacy-preserving tools, or a person who is curious and interested in learning more about what tools are already available? We want to hear about your experiences, so get in touch!

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