Lessons from Architecture School for IoT Security

Software is impermanent; its underlying code will always need updating. Architecture is enduring, meant to last for generations. But both strive to be intuitive, and architecture can teach security and UX professionals how to build IoT applications that balance seamless experience and upgradable infrastructure.

Security for the Internet of Things (IoT) needs design, and appropriate complexity is the key UX challenge for IoT. Architecture school teaches problem finding over problem solving and prepares professionals to work on complex systems.

Summary: Start with people in context, understand unspoken needs, homes are more than houses.
Summary slide from presentation at O’Reilly Solid in 2015. All slides are available for download.

Our three-part series discusses how lessons from architecture school can inform IoT security.

Lessons from architecture school for IoT security

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