Creating Patterns for Decentralized Systems

Exciting news! Simply Secure was awarded a SamsungNEXT grant for design in decentralization. This allows us to develop our long-standing idea of a pattern library for decentralized systems.

What do we mean by that?

By “design patterns”, we mean a best practice user flow or interaction that projects can use or draw from. An example of a design pattern would be a pop-up window for just-in-time consent. A pattern library, of course, is a collection of patterns. By “decentralised systems”, we mean protocols, apps, and services that are non-centralised–that includes both federated networks and the stronger concept of distributed networks (p2p).

We’ve been seeing some common challenges across the board for decentralization projects, such as communicating privacy, key management, and even just explaining what decentralized systems are. (Read more in our post.)

All projects working in this area are facing similar issues, and these issues don’t have to (and can’t!) be solved individually. Our hope is to get projects in this space to work together and come up with common solutions, and agree on design patterns to implement in a decentralised system. (The paradox!) This would also have the added benefit that users new to the decentralised world will only have to learn few new design patterns to participate in these projects.

Looking for collaborators!

Have you been thinking about similar problems in the past? We’re looking for collaborators to create UX/UI elements for decentralized systems. Write us at contact@simplysecure.org.

Are you working on a decentralization project? Get in touch – we’d love to speak to you about your needs and challenges for design and usability issues.

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